Category Archives: Everything Else

All the Broken Things Query

Query V3.5

Mech Corp engineers are recruited young, and they die young.

Scottish-Indian engineer Anna MacFarlane is a 17-year-old, five-foot-nothing whirlwind of a girl. While repairing the military’s unstable war machines, Anna’s attacked by one of the monsters the machines are made to kill: a skeletal cannibal named the Wendigo.

It infects her with a parasite that Mech Corp are very interested in studying. But while Anna’s been using military tech to maintain her badass bionic legs, her mum’s CMT disease is heading rapidly downhill. Anna can’t just abandon her.

She spearheads a mission to hunt the Wendigo down, but instead of allowing her to kill it Mech Corp quarantines it—and Anna too.

With the parasite chewing her down to nothing, Anna has to make a choice: trust Mech Corp needles and scalpels to save her, or turn against the squad she grew up with and become something monstrous herself.

ALL THE BROKEN THINGS is HANNIBAL meets SUPERNATURAL in a 70,000 word YA urban fantasy novel.

 

Query V.3 aka BASICALLY JACKFRED THANKYOUUU

Mech Corp engineers are recruited young, and they die young.

Scottish-Indian engineer Anna MacFarlane is a 17-year-old, five-foot-nothing whirlwind of a girl. While repairing the military’s unstable death machines, Anna’s caught unarmed by one of the monsters the machines are made to kill: a skeletal cannibal named the Wendigo.

It infects her with a parasite that the Mech Corp are very interested in studying. To avoid becoming a medical specimen, Anna spearheads a mission to hunt the Wendigo down. But instead of allowing her to kill it, Mech Corp quarantines it, and Anna too.

With the parasite chewing her down to nothing, Anna has to make a choice: trust Mech Corp needles and scalpels to save her, or turn against every Mech Corp teen she’s grown up with and become something monstrous herself.

ALL THE BROKEN THINGS is HANNIBAL meets SUPERNATURAL in a 70,000 word YA urban fantasy novel.

Query V.2

There’s two things you need to know about Mech Corp engineers: they’re recruited young, and they die young.

Scottish-Indian engineer Anna MacFarlane is a 17-year-old, five-foot-nothing whirlwind of a girl. After a long day repairing unstable military death machines, Anna’s caught unarmed and off-duty by one of the monsters their machines are made to kill: a skeletal cannibal named the Wendigo.

He infects her with a gut parasite that, like most things in her life, is probably trying to kill her. The Wendigo’s the only one who knows how the tapeworm ticks, so it’s down to Anna grab any weapon she can get – from her bionic legs, to the Mech Corp’s unstable killing machines, to her own bare fists  and hunt him down.

But Mech Corp won’t let her shoot him. In fact, they don’t want her to do anything but bring him in for some tests… and they want her quarantined as well. Just for a little while.

(A little while in an underground quarantine facility filled with needles, scalpels, and paperwork that calls her a “medical specimen”.)

With the parasite whittling her down to skin, bones, and wires, it all comes down to picking a target: let the military turn her into their labrat for their classified projects, or abandon every Mech Corp teen she’s grown up with and become something monstrous herself.

ALL THE BROKEN THINGS is HANNIBAL meets SUPERNATURAL in a 70,000 word YA urban fantasy novel.

 

—OLD STUFF BELOW.–

OLD Query V.1

There’s only three things you need to know about Mech Corp engineers:

1) They’re recruited young, 2) They’re trained fast, and 3) They die even faster.

Scottish-Indian engineer Anna MacFarlane is a 17-year-old, five-foot-nothing whirlwind of a girl. When a tall, pale and hungry Wendigo infects her with a probably-deadly disease… well, that just brings an inevitable death even closer. And she’s going down with guns blazing.

Grabbing every weapon she can get – from her bionic legs, to the Mech Corp’s unstable killing machines, to her own bare fists  she settles in for a fight against the cannibal Wendigo and the gut-eating parasite he put inside her. But while she plays the bait to lure the monster closer to the military, Anna starts to doubt the motives of the army at her back.

With a remaining lifespan that can be counted in days, it all comes down to picking a target: let the military turn her into their labrat, or abandon every Mech Corp teen she’s grown up with and become something monstrous herself.

ALL THE BROKEN THINGS is HANNIBAL meets SUPERNATURAL in a 70,000 word YA urban fantasy novel.

Best Book of January!

Today, for their Road Trip Wednesday question for bloggers, YA Highway asked: What’s the best book you’ve read this January?

Oooh, tough one when you look at everything I read last month…

I’m going to discount all the comics, which narrows it down to Pandemonium, Seraphina, and Teeth. Seraphina and Teeth are my clear favourites, but if I had to pick one… it’d be Seraphina.

It’s just such a fun, refreshing YA fantasy, (whereas Teeth was a very dark read and quite ruthless with the emotions). My review should be up tomorrow!

TeethSeraphinaBatman: Year OneSaga, Vol. 1PandemoniumBatman: A Death in the FamilySoul Eater NOT!, Vol. 1Soul Eater NOT!, Vol. 2

Road Trip Wednesday: Which Divergent Faction Are You?

Today, for their Road Trip Wednesday question for bloggers, YA Highway asked: What Faction Are You? In honor of their Book of the Month, Veronica Roth’s INSURGENT, we want to know which of the five factions in the DIVERGENT series would you choose? Here’s a great breakdown of the five factions, and if you’re on the fence, you can even take the quiz for a hint!

This one was a clear-cut choice for me.

  • Back when I reviewed Divergent, I had trouble putting myself in the reckless, foolhardy Dauntless group’s shoes, so  clearly don’t have the balls (or the lacking brain cells ;P) for that.
  • I focus a lot on my own goals (WRITING WRITING WRITING) so I’m too self-centered for the selfless Abnegation.
  • The quiz gave me Candor, and while I do love small doses blunt honesty I think I’d hate their tactless methods of deploying it.
  • Erudite, land of the bookworms and intellects, is the one calling to my inner Ravenclaw self. But they focus on reading non-fiction, and my passion lies with fiction.
  • So it was a clear-cut choice: Amity, the soft touches who think friendship will solve everyone’s problems. They’re basically the hippy faction, but they’re also the only faction that encourages the creation of art. And without art, I’d go mad very fast.

Now I really want to go read Insurgent…

 

February Book of the Month

Today, for their Road Trip Wednesday question for bloggers, YA Highway asked: What was the best book you read in February?

This is, without a doubt, Veronica Roth’s “Divergent”.

I’ve actually been completely conflicted about this book–I got so immersed in the world that I over thinking elements, which meant I started over thinking my review, so I froze up and stalled and avoided hitting ‘publish’ on the review because I was blowing up everything out of proportion.

And that’s how I know I loved it. I got ridiculously, unconsciously invested in the world.

I’ll pop the review up tomorrow. 🙂

What did you choose for your response? Drop a link to your answer in the comments!

 

5 Books to Read in 2012

A very late entry to Paper Hangover‘s Friday Fives today. They asked: What are the FIVE books you’re looking forward to in 2012?

The Knife of Never Letting Go (Chaos Walking).

Prentisstown isn’t like other towns. Everyone can hear everyone else’s thoughts in a constant, overwhelming, never-ending Noise. There is no privacy. There are no secrets.Or are there?

I bought this as an e-book without ever hearing anything about it, because of it’s brilliant title and intriguing storyline. Now a lot of people are talking about it, and after hearing one writer describe it as better than the Hunger Games I’m eager to try it out.

Shatter Me #2  by Tahereh Mafi.

I need more Warner. There is never enough Warner. And as mentioned in my review, I’m very curious about where Tahereh is going to take this series.

Divergent (and Insurgent) by Veronica Roth.

In Beatrice Prior’s dystopian Chicago world, society is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue—Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent). On an appointed day of every year, all sixteen-year-olds must select the faction to which they will devote the rest of their lives. For Beatrice, the decision is between staying with her family and being who she really is—she can’t have both. So she makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself.

“Divergent” has been on my to-read list for ages. This year will be the year I read it. Eventually.

Finale by Becca Fitzpatrick.

The final book in the paranormal romance series about a girl and a snarky fallen angel named Patch. I’m a fangirl for the “Hush, Hush” series, and I’ll be waiting patiently for the final volume to hit the shelves this Fall.

The Future of Us by Jay Asher and Carolyn Mackler.

It’s 1996 and very few high school students have ever used the internet. Facebook will not be invented until several years in the future. Emma just got a computer and an America Online CD. She and her best friend Josh power it up and log on – and discover themselves on Facebook in 2011. Everybody wonders what they’ll be like fifteen years in the future. Josh and Emma are about to find out.

I am reading this entirely because the two main characters are called Emma and Josh.

 

RTW: Required Reading

Today, for their Road Trip Wednesday feature, YA Highway asked: In high school, teens are made to read the classics – Shakespeare, Hawthorne, Bronte, Dickens – but there are a lot of books out there never taught in schools. So if you had the power to change school curriculums, which books would you be sure high school students were required to read?

I’ve chosen a curriculum geared towards open discussions, multimedia (movies! audiobooks!) and with prose geared to high-school (secondary school) readers. I kept a few of the classics and mixed in different tenses, genres and very different narrators.

A lot of the classics require a lot of translation (Shakespeare!) and working out the meaning behind old-fashioned words. This kills the joy of reading for a lot of readers, and a lot of these works speak to big, universal issues. Essential stuff, but kids are only going to take it in if they really put their mind to a book.

Fiction geared at younger readers speaks to them – issues in their life, language they can understand without a glossary down the side of the page. It’s fun, and fun reading is often forgotten in schools.

  • Harry Potter: Of course this has to be on there. Harry Potter’s a phenomenon, and has such a huge range of discussion topics. The mythology, the change in maturity levels,  the symbolism (Dumbledore and phoenixes!), the seamless integration of multicultural characters, the movie version changes, the Stephen Fry audiobooks!
  • Catcher in the Rye: Gotta keep in some of the classes. This is a pull-no-punches book for lads and ladies alike, and I love it too pieces. The narrator’s unique, and his strong opinions are always good discussion fodder.
  • Perks of Being A Wallflower: This has a lot of similarities to Catcher… as well as differences. It deals with difficult topics like abuse, themes like growing up, it’s in letter format with a strong first person narrator. It’s wonderfully blunt and honest.
  • Hunger Games:  The pacing! The present tense! The violence! The politics! There’s a lot to chew on in this trilogy, and while some of the politics might be lost the violence and social pressures will definitely ring true. If I were a teacher, I’d watch Battle Royale alongside this because of the similar themes.
  • Of Mice and Men: I love this book. Fast, with a very unique format, it was designed originally as a stageplay so each chapter begins with a detailed scene description and character descriptions are spare. It also has an entertaining audiobook (male narrators forcing female voices for the lady characters are always a riot), and a good movie.
  • Project – Pick a Banned Book: The end-of-the-year project would be to pick from a range of banned books and write about it, because exposure to new and old banned books is important so kids can voice their opinion on censorship.
What did you choose for your response? Drop a link to your answer in the comments!